June 6, 2016

[Communiqué] We Are All Biafrans
By Nextier Advisory
Synopsis
On Tuesday, May 31, 2016, Parrésia Publishers Limited and the African Centre for Information and Media Literacy, in partnership with the Shehu Musa Yar’Adua Foundation, with support from Nextier Advisory, hosted the public presentation of Chido Onumah’s “We Are All Biafrans: A Participant-Observer’s Intervention in a Country Sleepwalking to Disaster”. The event was moderated by Patrick O. Okigbo III, Principal Partner, Nextier Advisory, and featured a speech presentation and two discussion sessions on Nigeria’s federalism. The event was held at the Yar’Adua Centre in Abuja, Nigeria.

H.E. Atiku Abubakar, (two-time Vice President of the Federal Republic of Nigeria) was the Chairman of the event and presented the keynote address. This was followed by a review of the book by Dr. Chidi Odinkalu (Head, Africa Programme, Open Society Justice Initiative). Patrick O. Okigbo III moderated a panel discussion featuring Dr. Oby Ezekwesili (co-founder, Transparency International), Dr. Jibrin Ibrahim (former Director, Centre for Democracy & Development), Nnimmo Bassey (Executive Director, Health of Mother Earth Foundation), and Tope Fasua (CEO, Global Analytics Consulting Limited). The discussion covered a broad range of topics covered in the book.

Follow this link to view photos from the event: https://www.flickr.com/photos/nextieradvisory/albums/72157668538940730


June 6, 2016

[Opinion Piece] The Bite of Biafra
By Nnimmo Bassey
Synopsis
On Tuesday, May 31, 2016, Parrésia Publishers Limited and the African Centre for Information and Media Literacy, in partnership with the Shehu Musa Yar’Adua Foundation, with support from Nextier Advisory, hosted the public presentation of Chido Onumah’s “We Are All Biafrans: A Participant-Observer’s Intervention in a Country Sleepwalking to Disaster”. The event that was moderated by Patrick O. Okigbo III, Principal Partner, Nextier Advisory, featured a speech presentation and two discussion sessions on Nigeria’s federalism. The event was held at the Yar’Adua Centre in Abuja, Nigeria.

This opinion piece titled “The Bite of Biafra” was written by Nnimmo Bassey (Executive Director, Health of Mother Earth Foundation), and was inspired by Chido Onumah’s “We Are All Biafrans”.


June 6, 2016

[Book Review] We Are All Biafrans
By Dr. Chidi Odinkalu
Synopsis
On Tuesday, May 31, 2016, Parrésia Publishers Limited and the African Centre for Information and Media Literacy, in partnership with the Shehu Musa Yar’Adua Foundation, with support from Nextier Advisory, hosted the public presentation of Chido Onumah’s “We Are All Biafrans: A Participant-Observer’s Intervention in a Country Sleepwalking to Disaster”. The event that was moderated by Patrick O. Okigbo III, Principal Partner, Nextier Advisory, featured a speech presentation and two discussion sessions on Nigeria’s federalism. The event was held at the Yar’Adua Centre in Abuja, Nigeria.

Dr. Chidi Odinkalu (Head, Africa Programme, Open Society Justice Initiative) presented this review of the book at the event.


June 6, 2016

[Keynote Address] We Are All Biafrans
By H.E. Atiku Abubakar
Synopsis
On Tuesday, May 31, 2016, Parrésia Publishers Limited and the African Centre for Information and Media Literacy, in partnership with the Shehu Musa Yar’Adua Foundation, with support from Nextier Advisory, hosted the public presentation of Chido Onumah’s “We Are All Biafrans: A Participant-Observer’s Intervention in a Country Sleepwalking to Disaster”. The event that was moderated by Patrick O. Okigbo III, Principal Partner, Nextier Advisory, featured a speech presentation and two discussion sessions on Nigeria’s federalism. The event was held at the Yar’Adua Centre in Abuja, Nigeria.

This keynote address, titled “Restructuring for Nigeria’s National Unity”, was presented by H.E. Atiku Abubakar (two-time Vice President of the Federal Republic of Nigeria).


June 6, 2016

Nigeria Without Oil: Focusing on the Fundamentals
By Patrick Okigbo III
Synopsis
Patrick Okigbo III (Principal Partner, Nextier Advisory) was invited to deliver the keynote address at The Patriots in Leadership and Service Awards. The event was held on Saturday, June 4, 2016 at the Yar’Adua Centre, Abuja. The theme for the event was Economic Diversification: Appraising Nigeria’s willingness to divest from oil.

Patrick Okigbo III delivered this keynote address titled “Nigeria Without Oil: Focusing on the Fundamentals”.


April 25, 2016

Niger Delta Development Compact
A Case for a Coherent Development Strategy for the Niger Delta Region
By Niger Delta Technical Working Group (NDTWG)
Synopsis
Stabilising and consolidating security in the Niger Delta remains a fundamental strategic imperative for Nigeria and the governments in the region. Between 2010 and 2014, considerable funding estimated at N7.35 trillion (or US$37.31billion) was channelled into the region for development. Despite this quantum of funds, there was no commensurate improvement in the quality of life. Consequently, the challenge in the region is not funding, but financial governance, lack of coherent development plan and absence of coordinated implementation. Against this background, a case is being made for a coherent development strategy for the region guided by a common accountability framework to deliver measurable outcomes. This strategic framework shall be referred to as the “Niger Delta Development Compact” anchored on a Results Framework.

Nextier Advisory developed this Policy Brief in collaboration with other members of the Niger Delta Technical Working Group (NDTWG) as an advisory brief for the Federal Government. The Niger Delta Technical Working Group comprises of development agencies, government MDAs, and policy advisory firms that have been actively engaged in seeking a sustainable development solution for the Niger Delta region. Members of the Niger Delta Technical Working Group include Facility for Oil Sector Transparency and Reform, Nigeria Security and Reconciliation Programme, Foundation for Partnerships in the Niger Delta, Stakeholder Democracy Network, and Nextier. The group works actively with the Ministry of Niger Delta Affairs, Ministry of Environment, Niger Delta Development Commission, Presidential Amnesty Programme, and Office of the Special Adviser on Niger Delta.


March, 2016

Draft Policy Recommendations for Stabilisation and Sustainable Development in the Niger Delta
Output of the Niger Delta Way Forward Citizen-Led Policy Process
By Niger Delta Technical Working Group (NDTWG)
Synopsis
In February 2016, a Niger Delta Technical Workshop was held at the Transcorp Hilton Hotel, Abuja themed “Niger Delta Way Forward: From Stabilisation to Sustainable Development” by various Niger Delta stakeholders to brainstorm and collectively explore ways to develop joined up strategies that meet the need and challenges of the Niger Delta region. Six (6) thematic areas (Security Stabilisation, Economy and Markets, Environmental Management, Access to Energy, Governance and Rule of Law, and Ethics, Value Reorientation & Leadership) were identified as priority areas and policy recommendation papers were developed as background papers for discussions during the Technical Workshop.

This report highlights a draft set of policy recommendations that are outputs of director level technical policy discussions during the Niger Delta Technical Workshop. The Federal Ministry of Niger Delta Affairs, Niger Delta Development Commission, Office of the Special Adviser to the President on Niger Delta/Presidential Amnesty Programme, and Federal Ministry of Environment led this effort with technical support from members of the Niger Delta Technical Working Group (NDTWG). Members of the Niger Delta Technical Working Group include Facility for Oil Sector Transparency and Reform, Nigeria Security and Reconciliation Programme, Foundation for Partnerships in the Niger Delta, Stakeholder Democracy Network, and Nextier.


February 29, 2016

Niger Delta Way Forward Technical Workshop 
By Nextier Advisory
Synopsis
 A two-day technical workshop on development challenges in the Niger Delta was conducted at Transcorp Hilton in Abuja on February 23 – 24 2016 with the objectives of:

1) Highlighting the policy priority areas for the Niger Delta     2) Re-affirming commitment to collaborate on a joint policy response    3) Outlining the next steps to develop and implement a joint framework for sustainable development and    4) Identify areas for synergy with the private sector and development partners.

The technical workshop was convened by the Federal Ministry of Niger Delta Affairs (MNDA), Niger Delta Development Commission (NDDC), Presidential Amnesty Programme (PAP), and the Federal Ministry of Environment with support from development partners working in the Niger Delta — Foundation for Partnership Initiatives in the Niger Delta (PIND), Nigeria Stability and Reconciliation Programme (NSRP), Stakeholders Democracy Network (SDN), Facility for Oil Sector Transparency and Reform (FOSTER), and Nextier Advisory. The workshop consisted of paper presentations and round-table discussions.

Proceedings from the workshop were tweeted live via #NDWayForward. Please follow this link to view the Storify (Tweet Summary) for the event: https://storify.com/NextierAdvisory/niger-delta-way-forward-from-stabilization-to-sust


January 26, 2016

[Transcript] Nigeria and the Biafra Agitation
By Nextier Advisory
Synopsis
On Friday, January 15, 2016, Nextier Advisory, through its public policy initiative (developmentdiscourse™) organised a public dialogue on Nigeria and the renascent agitation for Biafra. The discourse was held at the Yar’Adua Centre in Abuja, Nigeria. This event, which is the first in a three-part public discussion series on the Biafra agitation, aimed to identify the root causes of the agitation and proffer solutions to diffuse the tension in a proactive and sustainable manner. Chief Olusegun Obasanjo, GCFR (two-time President of the Federal Republic of Nigeria) presented the keynote address. He subsequently joined a panel of discussants consisting of Chief Simon Okeke, OFR (former Chairman, Police Service Commission), Tolu Ogunlesi (West Africa Editor, The Africa Report), Kadaria Ahmed (Host “Straight Talk with Kadaria”), and Chido Onumah (Coordinator, African Centre for Media and Information Literacy). Patrick O. Okigbo III (Principal Partner, Nextier Advisory) moderated the session while Jerome Okolo (Executive Vice Chairman, GeoQinetiq Limited) was the compère.
This is the full transcript of the dialogue at the event.


January 26, 2016

[Communiqué] Nigeria and the Biafra Agitation
By Nextier Advisory
Synopsis
On Friday, January 15, 2016, Nextier Advisory, through its public policy initiative (developmentdiscourse™) organised a public dialogue on Nigeria and the renascent agitation for Biafra. The discourse was held at the Yar’Adua Centre in Abuja, Nigeria. This event, which is the first in a three-part public discussion series on the Biafra agitation, aimed to identify the root causes of the agitation and proffer solutions to diffuse the tension in a proactive and sustainable manner. Chief Olusegun Obasanjo, GCFR (two-time President of the Federal Republic of Nigeria) presented the keynote address. He subsequently joined a panel of discussants consisting of Chief Simon Okeke, OFR (former Chairman, Police Service Commission), Tolu Ogunlesi (West Africa Editor, The Africa Report), Kadaria Ahmed (Host “Straight Talk with Kadaria”), and Chido Onumah (Coordinator, African Centre for Media and Information Literacy). Patrick O. Okigbo III (Principal Partner, Nextier Advisory) moderated the session while Jerome Okolo (Executive Vice Chairman, GeoQinetiq Limited) was the compère.


January 26, 2016

[Introduction] Nigeria and the Biafra Agitation
By Jerome Okolo
Synopsis
On January 15, 2016, Nextier Advisory through its public policy initiative (Development Discourse), organised a dialogue on the resurgent Biafra Agitation. This introduction was delivered by Jerome Okolo. The Development Discourse event was held at the Yar’Adua Centre Abuja.


January 26, 2016

“What Do Igbos Want?”
By Obi Nwakanma
Synopsis
Essay on the marginalization of Igbos by Obi Nwakanma.


January 26, 2016

[Keynote Address] Nigeria and the Biafra Agitation
By Chief Olusegun Obasanjo
Synopsis
On January 15, 2016, Nextier Advisory through its public policy initiative (Development Discourse), organised a dialogue on the resurgent Biafra Agitation. This keynote address was delivered by Chief Olusegun Obasanjo (GCFR).The Development Discourse event was held at the Yar’Adua Centre Abuja.


December, 2015

Ethics, Value Orientation and Leadership Development in the Niger Delta
Recommendations for the Way Forward
By Federal Ministry of Niger Delta Affairs (MNDA)
Synopsis
The need to articulate a framework for value orientation and leadership development in the Niger Delta cannot be overemphasised. For decades, 
the problems of the Delta have been the subject
of discussion both at national and global levels. Governments, international agencies, statesmen, academics and different interest groups have all devoted considerable time and energy to grappling with these challenges. Commissions and Panels have been set up, wars have been fought in the creeks, numerous suggestions have been made and billions of development dollars have been channeled into the region, yet the indicators of development remain at abysmal levels. This paper highlights that one of the greatest challenges faced in the Niger Delta today – underlying insecurity, unemployment or violence – is the loss of ethical values, faith, self-esteem and sense of community. This policy recommendation paper highlights the problematic moral foundations of the Niger Delta and articulates a framework for the development of ethical orientation and leadership development in the region.

This paper was developed by the Federal Ministry of Niger Delta Affairs with technical support from other members of the Niger Delta Technical Working Group (NDTWG) as one of the six (6) background papers for a Niger Delta Technical Workshop to be held in February 2016. Members of the Niger Delta Technical Working Group include Facility for Oil Sector Transparency and Reform, Nigeria Security and Reconciliation Programme, Foundation for Partnerships in the Niger Delta, Stakeholder Democracy Network, and Nextier. The group works actively with the Ministry of Niger Delta Affairs, Ministry of Environment, Niger Delta Development Commission, Presidential Amnesty Programme, and Office of the Special Adviser on Niger Delta.


December, 2015

Governance and Rule of Law Policy for the Niger Delta
Recommendations for the Way Forward
By Nextier Advisory | Stakeholder Democracy Network (SDN)
Synopsis
Poor governance is at the root of the current instability in the Niger Delta, and has wider repercussions for the West Africa region. Since gaining independence, ruling elites have tilted the entire governance system of the country towards informal patronage networks that extract oil rents and protect privileged business interests. Exploitation of this system means that the benefits of the crude oil resources being extracted from the Niger Delta- and from other national economic activities – have not been abundantly available to develop capacity at different levels of government. This paper highlights the governance issues in the Niger Delta and Nigeria as a whole and advises the Federal Government on policy responses to implement as strategies for improving governance and the rule of law policy for the Niger Delta.

This paper was developed by Stakeholder Democracy Network in collaboration with Nextier with support from other members of the Niger Delta Technical Working Group (NDTWG) as one of the six (6) background papers for a Niger Delta Technical Workshop to be held in February 2016. Members of the Niger Delta Technical Working Group include Facility for Oil Sector Transparency and Reform, Nigeria Security and Reconciliation Programme, Foundation for Partnerships in the Niger Delta, Stakeholder Democracy Network, and Nextier. The group works actively with the Ministry of Niger Delta Affairs, Ministry of Environment, Niger Delta Development Commission, Presidential Amnesty Programme, and Office of the Special Adviser on Niger Delta.


December, 2015

Environmental Management Policy in the Niger Delta
Recommendations for the Way Forward
By Nextier Advisory | Stakeholder Democracy Network (SDN)
Synopsis
Nigeria is facing a national environmental emergency. After more than fifty years of negligence in the oil industry, the accumulation of oil spills and pollutants from flaring of gas have made the Niger Delta one of the most toxic environments in the world. Combined with discharged industrial, domestic and human waste, the pollution is having a severe negative impact on biological communities, water quality, human health, and traditional livelihoods across the Niger Delta region. This paper presents a case for the environmental remediation of the region and contains environmental management policy recommendations for the Government to implement to respond to the environment degradation issues in the Niger Delta region.

This paper was developed by Stakeholder Democracy Network in collaboration with Nextier with support from other members of the Niger Delta Technical Working Group (NDTWG) as one of the six (6) background papers for a Niger Delta Technical Workshop to be held in February 2016. Members of the Niger Delta Technical Working Group include Facility for Oil Sector Transparency and Reform, Nigeria Security and Reconciliation Programme, Foundation for Partnerships in the Niger Delta, Stakeholder Democracy Network, and Nextier. The group works actively with the Ministry of Niger Delta Affairs, Ministry of Environment, Niger Delta Development Commission, Presidential Amnesty Programme, and Office of the Special Adviser on Niger Delta.


December, 2015

Markets for Development in the Niger Delta
Recommendations for the Way Forward
By Nextier Advisory | Stakeholder Democracy Network (SDN)
Synopsis
The Niger Delta region needs market systems that are efficient, inclusive, sustainable and beneficial to the poor. However, access issues constrain the ability of the rural poor to derive maximum value from markets. The Niger Delta needs market-led economic development that is focused on reducing poverty and inequality. The guiding principles should be for government to focus on providing the enabling environment, the private sector should lead on developing the infrastructure, and development partners should work with the government to improve on governance. This paper examines why the Niger Delta economy does not work for the poor and presents a case for government to commence widespread development of the Niger Delta region to ensure appropriate strategies for a market-led development of the region.

This paper was developed by Nextier in collaboration with other members of the Niger Delta Technical Working Group (NDTWG) as one of the six (6) background papers for a Niger Delta Technical Workshop to be held in February 2016. Members of the Niger Delta Technical Working Group include Facility for Oil Sector Transparency and Reform, Nigeria Security and Reconciliation Programme, Foundation for Partnerships in the Niger Delta, Stakeholder Democracy Network, and Nextier. The group works actively with the Ministry of Niger Delta Affairs, Ministry of Environment, Niger Delta Development Commission, Presidential Amnesty Programme, and Office of the Special Adviser on Niger Delta.


December, 2015

Access to Energy Policy for the Niger Delta
Recommendations for the Way Forward
By Nextier Advisory | Stakeholder Democracy Network (SDN)
Synopsis
Access to reliable electricity in the Niger Delta is essential to create an economy that can create jobs and broader development processes required for stability of the region. The vast majority of the residents in the region live in 
rural areas, which are disproportionately disadvantaged when it comes to access to electricity, with just 34 percent electricity access compared to 84 percent in urban areas . As a result local businesses remain small, and urban migration for work in the region is among the highest rates in the world. This paper presents a case for the need of a steady supply of power and discusses the integral parts of access to energy policy as part of the strategies to boost the Niger Delta economy and increase the investment opportunities by increasing the ease of doing business.

This paper was developed by Stakeholder Democracy Network in collaboration with Nextier with support from other members of the Niger Delta Technical Working Group as one of the six (6) background papers for a Niger Delta Technical Workshop to be held in February 2016. Members of the Niger Delta Technical Working Group include Facility for Oil Sector Transparency and Reform, Nigeria Security and Reconciliation Programme, Foundation for Partnerships in the Niger Delta, Stakeholder Democracy Network, and Nextier. The group works actively with the Ministry of Niger Delta Affairs, Ministry of Environment, Niger Delta Development Commission, Presidential Amnesty Programme, and Office of the Special Adviser on Niger Delta.


December, 2015

Security and Stabilisation in the Niger Delta
By Nextier Advisory | Stakeholder Democracy Network (SDN)
Synopsis
The stability of the Niger Delta region remains fragile, as displayed in the violence witnessed 
during the 2015 general elections, the inconclusive gubernatorial election in Rivers State, the tensions in Bayelsa State and ongoing Biafra agitations. At the peak of the insurgency, the region experienced a considerable decline in economic activities. This paper explores the interrelated drivers of the conflict, and proposes policy recommendations to address the prevailing challenges and reduce future instability.

This paper was developed by Nextier in collaboration with other members of the Niger Delta Technical Working Group as one of the six (6) background papers for a Niger Delta Technical Workshop to be held in February 2016. Members of the Niger Delta Technical Working Group include Facility for Oil Sector Transparency and Reform, Nigeria Security and Reconciliation Programme, Foundation for Partnerships in the Niger Delta, Stakeholder Democracy Network, and Nextier. The group works actively with the Ministry of Niger Delta Affairs, Ministry of Environment, Niger Delta Development Commission, Presidential Amnesty Programme, and Office of the Special Adviser on Niger Delta.


December 14, 2015

Political Economy Analysis
On the funds set up by the Federal Government of Nigeria to reduce unrest in the Niger Delta.
By Nextier Advisory
Synopsis This report is a political economy analysis of the funds set up and provided by the Federal Government of Nigeria to reduce unrest and develop the Niger Delta region. The report shows that about N7.35 trillion has been channelled into the Niger Delta region through various funding mechanisms between 2010 and 2014.

Eleven funds were analysed in the report including statutory allocation of 13 percent of the proceeds from crude oil sales, allocations from the Federal Budget to the Niger Delta States, allocations to Federal Ministry of Niger Delta Affairs, Niger Delta Development Commission, Presidential Amnesty Programme, Hydrocarbon Pollution Restoration Programme, Ecological Fund, Pipeline Security Contracts for the Nigerian National Petroleum Corporation, allocations from the Millennium Development Goals, contributions from the international oil companies, and support from development agencies.

The report concluded that governance challenges (accountability and transparency process), and not the quantum of funds, is the principal problem affecting development of the Niger Delta region.


December 4, 2015

Communique: [Development Discourse] Transition Strategy for the Presidential Amnesty Programme
Options and Implications for Security and Development in the Niger Delta
By Eniwo Egbeme
Synopsis
On November 18, 2015, Nextier Advisory through its public policy initiative (Development Discourse), organised a dialogue on the transition strategy for the Presidential Amnesty Programme. The keynote address was delivered by Gen. Paul Boroh (Chairman of the Presidential Amnesty Programme and Special Adviser on Niger Delta to the President), and the panel discussants included Aso Tambo (ex-general of a militant group and Leader of the ex-agitators in Phase 2 of the Presidential Amnesty Programme), Mr. Austin Mgbolu (Director, Federal Ministry of Niger Delta Affairs) and Mr. Charles Achodo (Executive Director, Nextier Advisory, & Expert on Disarmament, Demobilization and Reintegration). Patrick O. Okigbo III (Principal Partner, Nextier Advisory) moderated the session.
The Development Discourse event, which was held at the Thought Pyramid Art Centre Abuja, attracted members of the policy community, think tanks, diplomatic community, development agencies, civil society, public and civil services, and the media. The dialogue was focused on resolving the questions that the purported closure of the Presidential Amnesty Programme has raised.
Copy this link to your browser to view photos from the event- https://www.flickr.com/photos/nextieradvisory/albums/72157661456959111/with/22777748169/


November 12, 2015

Background Paper: Transition Strategy for the Presidential Amnesty Programme
Options and Implications for Security and Development in the Niger Delta
By Eniwo Egbeme
Synopsis
The Presidential Amnesty Programme (PAP) for ex-agitators in the Niger Delta, which commenced in 2009, has achieved its core goal of stabilising the security situation in the region of Nigeria and restored Nigeria’s crude oil production to pre-conflict levels. President Muhammadu Buhari, in his inaugural speech as civilian president of Nigeria,
indicated that the programme would be closed in December 2015. This announcement was met with opposition especially from the Niger Delta region. Since the programme is not intended to continue in perpetuity, there is need to consider the various options for transitioning the programme.
This is a background paper for a public discourse to be hosted by Nextier Advisory to
explore optimal strategies for transitioning the Presidential Amnesty Programme.


November 9, 2015

Transitional Strategy for the Presidential Amnesty Programme (PAP)
Options and Implications for Security and Development in the Niger Delta
By Nextier Research
Synopsis
The Transitional Strategy for the Presidential Amnesty Programme (PAP) for ex-agitators in the Niger Delta region of Nigeria is a report that provides the Federal Government of Nigeria with evidence-based policy options on how to transition the amnesty programme without undermining the stable security conditions in the Niger Delta region. The report states that the optimal transitional strategy should sustain the stabilised security condition in the region, fulfill government’s commitments to the ex-agitators, build on the gains of the Amnesty Programme, and address the fundamental development challenges that is the stated cause of the insurgency in the region.

This strategy document proposes the closure of the programme by transitioning the remaining caseloads into existing national development programmes while retaining the Office of the Special Adviser to the President on Niger Delta Affairs as the focal point to ensure that relevant national agencies deliver the outstanding commitments to the remaining caseload of ex-agitators. The report conclusively recommends the closure of the programme after a period of six months within which time the government must have met its commitments for reintegration assistance to all beneficiaries under the programme. This decision must be preceded by independently verifiable and irrevocable commitment by the government to the development of the region to the extent agreed with the leaders of the region.


October 28, 2015

Budgeting for Change
Should Nigeria Adopt Zero-Based Budgeting
By Teniola Tayo
Synopsis
The new administration in Nigeria recognises that the country’s recurrent budget (72 percent in 2015) does not leave enough resources to be invested in growth-enabling assets such as infrastructure. As a result, it is proposing to adopt Zero-Based Budgeting for the 2016 budget.
This proposal would be a radical departure from the incremental budgeting that has been in
practice in Nigeria for many years.


May 23, 2015

Fuel Subsidy Reform
Pragmatic Options for the Incoming Government
By Neil McCulloch and Patrick O. Okigbo III
Synopsis
The fuel subsidy system in Nigeria is in urgent need of reform. The recently released Forensic Audit of Nigerian National Petroleum Corporation by PricewaterhouseCoopers showed that fuel subsidies cost Nigeria almost $10 billion between January 2012 and July 2013. Over recent years the fuel subsidy has been between 2 and 5 times the size of the federal education budget and up to 7 times the health budget. Most of the subsidy does not reach the poor because the richest 40 percent of Nigerians consume 85 percent of the gasoline; the poorest 20 percent consume only 2.1 percent. The subsidy system causes shortages and long queues at petrol stations; even when available, most ordinary Nigerians have to pay more than the subsidised price. Subsidies also discourage investment in refineries – one reason why Nigeria produces only 10 percent of the gasoline it consumes.


April 14, 2015

Ending Corruption with the Corporate Corruption Act (The Bribecode)
A Proposal for the Incoming Administration
By Chuma Nwokolo and Patrick O. Okigbo III
Synopsis
The proposed Corporate Corruption Act (or “The Bribecode”) focuses on the role of the Private Sector in enabling corruption. The Bribecode solves the problem of weak enforcement of anti-corruption laws by creating a system that is largely self-regulating, solves the problem of sabotage by corrupt heads of agencies, and solves the problem of a compromised Public Sector. A draft of the Bill for the Corporate Corruption Act is included at the end of the document.


April 14, 2015

Who Wants To Be A Minister?
A Proposal for the Incoming Administration
By Patrick O. Okigbo III
Synopsis
The ability of the incoming administration to deliver on its #Change agenda will depend, in part, on the candidates selected as chief executives for the various ministries, departments and agencies1. This document outlines an effective process for selecting top talents for ministerial positions. The process ensures competence, reduces “godfatherism”, ensures transparency, reduces opportunities for lobbying, and provides the opportunity for Nigerians to track the progress of the ministerial appointees towards achieving the goals for the various ministries. It is a significant departure from the current process and is likely to be met with resistance from the political class; yet, it is an opportunity for the
Buhari-Osinbajo administration to signal to Nigerians (and the world) that it is committed to the #Change Agenda.


April 10, 2015

Change through a Reinvigorated Civil Service Reform Programme
A Proposal for the Incoming Administration
By Tunji Olaopa, PhD
Synopsis
The success of the incoming administration is predicated on the ability of the Nigerian Civil Service to deliver on the Change Agenda. This will require a reform of the civil service to become more results-
driven and shift from existing rules and hierarchical bureaucratic structure to a mix of entrepreneurial, technocratic and managerial culture. This Policy Brief outlines a set of general and specific action points to achieve change through a reinvigorated civil service reform programme.


April 10, 2015

Expanding Nigeria’s Agribusiness
A Proposal for the Incoming Administration
By Debisi Araba, PhD
Synopsis
The incoming federal administration in Nigeria (2015) has indicated that agriculture would be one of its major engines for economic development. This Policy Brief argues that the current leadership at the Federal Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development has created a foundation for the development of Nigeria’s agriculture. This document presents twenty actionable points for consideration in creating an agriculture policy focused on wealth and job creation.


March 27, 2015

Remove the Subsidies Now!
By Nextier Research
Synopsis
Data from recent monthly survey of consumers of petroleum products in Nigeria show the ineffectiveness of the fuel subsidy regime. This paper argues for a complete removal of subsidies on petroleum products.


March 02, 2015

Coal Power: Pricing It Right
By Nextier Research
Synopsis
The fuel cost used in calculating the tariff for electricity generated from coal sources should incorporate the comprehensive cost of coal and limestone. The comprehensive cost should include cost of the resource, transportation cost, etc. Nextier Research suggests a benchmark cost of US$209.81 per tonne of coal (imported from South Africa) and US$65.00 per tonne of limestone (sourced from Nigeria). Additional costs of US$0.27 per tonne per kilometre for coal and US$0.46 per tonne per kilometre for limestone should be applied as local transportation cost from the seaport (Lagos or Port Harcourt) to the power plant. Nextier Research suggests that the benchmark to imported coal should be phased out after an 8-year period and replaced with the cost of locally mined coal. The suggested period is long enough for investors in coal resources to develop their coal mines and supply coal to the power plants.
This paper presents an analysis of the comprehensive cost of coal and limestone for power plants.


February 28, 2015

Paper: Setting the Context⎪2015 Elections: D-Day And The Morning After
By Mrs. Awele Okigbo (Partner, Nextier Strategic Communications)
Synopsis
“When citizens go to the polls and cast their votes, they aspire not only to elect their leaders, but to choose a direction for their nation.”- Koffi Annan. Nigeria is indeed at a turning point as a country. The power of the vote allows Nigeria’s 68 million registered voters to choose a direction for their country at the upcoming 2015 Presidential elections. As Nigerians approach this historic and polemic event with trepidation, we must learn from the missteps of others, as well as our own, in order to prevent history repeating itself. Mrs. Awele Okigbo, Partner, Nextier Strategic Communications
 presented this paper in her opening remarks at the Development Discourse event held on Saturday February 28, 2015 at the Shehu Musa Yar’Adua Center, Abuja.


January 30, 2015

Communique: Solving Boko Haram Challenge
By Nextier
Synopsis
On January 29, 2015, Nextier Advisory, through its public policy initiative (Development Discourse), organised a public discourse to seek solutions to the Boko Haram challenge. The Presidential Amnesty Programme (for ex-agitators in the Niger Delta Region) was used as the context for the discussions. This Communique outlines nine (9) elements that should be considered in developing a solution to the Niger Delta challenge.


January 30, 2015

Guest Paper: Lessons from the Resolution of the Niger Delta Crisis
By Hon. Kingsley Kuku
Synopsis
It was a difficult time as the Federal Government responded with the use of force, a continuation of the policy that led to the unfortunate loss of hundreds (if not thousands) of precious lives on all sides including of course the “judicial murder” of world acclaimed environmentalist, Ken Saro- Wiwa in November 1995. Hon. Kingsley Kuku (Chairman, Presidential Amnesty Programme) presented this paper in his opening speech at the Development Discourse event held on Thursday January 29, 2015 at the Transcorp Hilton Hotel Abuja.


January 30, 2015

Paper: Why We Must Solve The Boko Haram Challenge
By Eniwoareke Egbeme
Synopsis
The North East region used to be one of the economically promising regions of the country. It was the bastion of commerce and trade with prominent local enterprises. The region drew in entrepreneurs, technocrats and bureaucrats from other regions in Nigeria. Its natural resource base increased its investment and industrial potential. In those days, the region enjoyed religious, cultural and ethnic harmony. Eniwoareke Egbeme, Analyst, Nextier presented this paper in his opening remarks at the Development Discourse event held on Thursday January 29, 2015 at the Transcorp Hilton Hotel Abuja


January 26, 2015

Curbing Militancy in Nigeria
(Understanding the Presidential Amnesty Programme)
By Eniwoareke Egbeme
Synopsis
The Presidential Amnesty Programme (PAP), which commenced in 2009, has achieved its core goals of solving the militant agitation in the Niger Delta region of Nigeria and increasing the nation’s crude oil production. However, the decline of militancy in the Niger Delta region coincided with the rise of the Boko Haram terrorist organization; a problem which if unchecked, can significantly affect quality of life in many parts of Nigeria. This Policy Brief reviews the activities of PAP in the hope that some of the lessons learnt in the South can be leveraged to solve the terrorism now ravaging the North.


January 17, 2015

The Economic Outlook 2015
Power Sector: Implications and Opportunities
By Patrick O. Okigbo III
Synopsis
There are significant opportunities and challenges in Nigeria’s power sector. A great deal of progress has been made with the reform of Nigeria’s power sector; nevertheless, significant challenges persist along the value chain, which unresolved will impact the growth of Nigeria’s economy especially in light of foreign exchange proceeds. These challenges represent billions of dollars of commercial opportunities in the public and private sector. Patrick O. Okigbo III, Principal Partner Nextier, in this presentation at the 2015 Economic Summit gave a comprehensive evaluation of the power sector reform and the investment opportunities in the power sector.


December 09, 2014

DEFINING HIS LEGACY: Obasanjo’s Campaign to Situate His Place in History
Book Review: My Watch
By Patrick O. Okigbo III
Synopsis
President Olusegun Obasanjo has bestridden Nigeria for over 50 years. In his most recent memoirs, “My Watch”, he attempts in a three-volume book to situate his place in Nigeria’s history. He leaves no one in doubt that he has a biblical conviction that he is God’s Watchman over Nigeria and, the subtext seeks to position him as the father of modern Nigeria. The book lays out what he considers to be his achievements while naming and shaming all those he believes have worked against Nigeria’s progress. He provides evidence to backup his claims.


July 11, 2014

[FRSC Paper 5] Partnerships for Life
(Theme 5: Promoting Multi-sector Stakeholder Cooperation)
By Nextier
Synopsis
The Federal Road Safety Corps (FRSC) has developed a strategy to improve safety on Nigerian roads. In 2010, the Global Road Safety Partnership worked with FRSC to establish a National Road Safety Partnership (NRSP) between public sector, private sector and civil society. In addition, FRSC partnered with the World Bank and other donor organisations to fund intervention programmes and projects to improve the effectiveness of the Corps’ operations and reduce road traffic crashes (RTCs). This paper, “Partnerships for Life”, chronicles the efforts of FRSC to promote multi-sector stakeholder cooperation towards creating a safe motoring environment in Nigeria.


May 19, 2014

[FRSC Paper 4] Commitment to Excellence
(Theme 4: Achieving Operational Excellence)
By Nextier
Synopsis
In pursuit of its mandate to create a safe motoring environment in Nigeria, FRSC committed itself to a pursuit of operational excellence. The attainment of the ISO 9001:2001 (Quality management System) – a first for a public sector organisation in Nigeria – led to significant improvements in the Corps’ internal processes. These improvements have resulted in more effective patrol operations and enforcement of road safety laws: overloading, seat belt use, crash helmet use, driving habits, vehicle roadworthiness, safety engineering of roads, emergency response, post-crash care, etc. These initiatives resulted in a 26 percent drop in reported road traffic crashes from 2007 to 2012. Severity Index, which is a measure of deaths to total number of casualties, dropped from 20.8 percent in 2007 to 17 percent in 2012. This paper, “Commitment to Excellence”, chronicles the process through which FRSC achieved its operational excellence through a commitment to quality service and continuous improvement.


May 19, 2014

[FRSC Paper 3] eReform @ the Speed of Data
(Theme 3: Deployment Enabling Technology)
By Nextier
Synopsis
The transformation of the Federal Road Safety Corps (FRSC) can be attributed, in part, to the deployment of technology-enabled processes to enable data-driven decision-making. Aided by a network of technologies, FRSC has improved responses to traffic-related emergencies and achieved a 76 percent decrease in reported road traffic crashes from 1988 to 2012. Over the same period, there has been a 25 percent drop in the number of casualties from road traffic crashes. FRSC’s system-wide technology is at the core of this significant decline in crash related death. These achievements have earned the Corps a number of national and international awards as well as recognition as a world-class public sector agency. Between 2007 and 2012, FRSC made significant investments in technology to improve its data-driven decision-making. This paper, “eReform @ the Speed of Data”, chronicles these initiatives.


May 19, 2014

[FRSC Paper 2] Getting the Corps to Dance
(Theme 2: Creating a High Performance Organization)
By Nextier
Synopsis
The Federal Road Safety Corps (FRSC) has made significant progress to eradicate road traffic crashes and create a safe motoring environment in Nigeria. The number of deaths per 10,000 registered vehicles dropped from 156 deaths in 1988 (at the inception of the Corps) to 41 deaths in 2012. Credit for this remarkable achievement goes to the management and officers of the Corps who have gone through significant transformation to create an organisation that consistently delivers on its goals – a high performance organisation. This paper, “Getting the Corps to Dance”, chronicles the initiatives FRSC has used to create a high performance organisation. These initiatives include a robust performance management system, high performance work tools, staff retention programmes and anti-corruption schemes. Please click on the link to download the paper.


May 19, 2014

[FRSC Paper 1] Priming the Corps to Win
(Theme 1: Institutional Framework)
By Nextier
Synopsis
Without committed action, by the year 2020 more people in Nigeria will die from road traffic crashes than from malaria or HIV. At the inception of the Federal Road Safety Corp in 1988, Nigeria recorded about 156 deaths per 10,000 registered vehicles. As at December 2012, the ratio had improved to 41 deaths per 10,000 vehicles. The current FRSC management has set a goal of improving the ratio to 3.2 deaths per 10,000 by 2020. To achieve this goal, FRSC has embarked on a journey to establish the right institutional framework, create a high performance organisation, deploy enabling technology, achieve operational excellence and create stakeholder partnerships. Much progress has been made and the Corps is primed to create a safe motoring environment in Nigeria. This paper, “Priming the Corps to Win”, chronicles the initiatives FRSC has used to develop its institutional framework that positions FRSC as the lead agency for road safety management.


May 16, 2014

Job Creation Strategies and Employment Creation in Nigeria
By CSEA and Nextier
Synopsis Amidst the stable growth in Nigeria’s economy averaged at 7% for over 5 years, youth unemployment rose from 30% in 2007 to 42% in 2012. However 2.3 million new entrants are released into the labour market every year. This justified a need for quick action, as such CSEA and Nextier did a detailed research and the outcome provided the basis for a policy dialogue. This research presentation posits that to create more jobs, there needs to be a big push in the sectors that create more jobs. Thereby opening up the dialogue with the question “where should the big push come from?”. The dialogue involved government sector players, private investors and civil society organizations deliberating on strategies for job creation.


April 15, 2014

Power Investors Summit: Nigeria 2014
Post Summit Report
By Nextier and EnergyNet
Synopsis The Power Investors Summit: Nigeria is the annual meeting of the Nigeria Power Sector, which provides an open platform for continuous dialogue between policy makers and private sector participants. The meeting is positioned to driving international and local investments in Nigeria’s fast emerging power sector. The 2014 edition with the theme “Maintaining Momentum in Nigeria’s Power Sector” was focused on policy, governance, industrialization, and resource management as it relates to the sector. Participants at the Summit discussed challenges, scoped opportunities, and developed recommendations for the sector. In addition to the Honourable Minister of Power, there was representation for C-level professionals from both the private and public sectors.


April 9, 2014

Funding Education: Money is Not The Problem
By Patrick O. Okigbo III and Francesca Pat-Ekeji
Synopsis This Op-ed asserts that to improve the Nigerian education system, money is not the problem as opined by so many. It suggests that in improving the educational system; processes and accountability are key. A way to achieve both is through Public-Private Partnerships that are not limited to providing funds but extend to the provision of oversight.


April 4, 2014

Expert Suggests PPP Strategy for Education Sector Development
By Daily Independent News
Synopsis In an interview with News Agency of Nigeria, Patrick O. Okigbo III, Principal Partner, Nextier, argued that private sector involvement is required to fund education in Nigeria. He highlighted various Public-Private Partnership models in education.


March 30, 2014

Rethinking Nigeria’s Job Creation Strategy
By CSEA and Nextier
Synopsis Unemployment is a critical policy challenge in Nigeria. It has continued to worsen in the face of a continuous economic growth averaged at 7 percent over the last 10 years. This situation is despite several interventions by various Nigerian governments over the last half century. The paper, “Rethinking Nigeria’s Job Creation Strategy”, was developed by Nextier and the Centre for the Study of Economies of Africa (CSEA) as an input into the ongoing discussions on how to get the Nigerian economy to start creating jobs. The new strategy should focus on skills, infrastructure and innovation.


March 28, 2014

Sanusigate: Sustaining the Debate for Improved Transparency in Nigeria’s Oil and Gas Sector
By Patrick O. Okigbo III
Synopsis Mallam Sanusi Lamido Sanusi, Governor of the Central Bank of Nigeria (CBN), in a letter to President Goodluck Jonathan alleged potential fraud at the Nigerian National Petroleum Corporation (NNPC). This Policy Brief presents the facts of the case and recommends an operational and financial audit of NNPC instituted and funded by an independent body and conducted by a firm that has in-depth understanding of the workings of the different parties in Nigeria’s petroleum industry.


March 16, 2014

Marginal fields: Non- passage of Petroleum Industrial Bill created confusion
By Sunday Newswatch
Synopsis “The non-passage of the Petroleum Industry Bill (PIB) has created confusion as to the fiscal regime under which the industry would operate” says Patrick in an interview with Newswatch. He explained extensively how the delay in passing the PIB had hampered the sectors progress with more emphasis on the ongoing sale of Marginal Oil field. Patrick recommends what should be done to ensure the timely passage of the PIB.


March 12, 2014

WEF on Africa 2014: Positioning Nigeria for Infrastructure Investment By Patrick O. Okigbo III
Synopsis According to Jim O’Neill, an economist, Mexico, Indonesia, Nigeria and Turkey (MINT economies) are expected to produce the highest return on investment in the next 10 years. In fact, Nigeria is poised to become one of the world’s largest economies in the 21st century overtaking economies such as Italy, France and the United Kingdom. This newspaper publication highlights the economic growth history of Nigeria in recent years as validation for Jim O’Neil’s prediction and as such referring to Nigeria as investors haven.


March 10, 2014

Sanusigate – Opportunity for Fresh Air By Patrick O. Okigbo III and Francesca Pat-Ekeji
Synopsis
In late September 2013, Sanusi Lamido Sanusi, Governor of the Central Bank of Nigeria (CBN) sent a letter to President Goodluck Jonathan alleging gross corruption at Nigerian National Petroleum Corporation (NNPC). The letter, which leaked to the press, triggered a cacophony of accusations and counterclaims. In contention is $12 billion, which NNPC claims to have spent as follows: kerosene subsidy ($8.49 billion), 2011 fuel subsidy ($1.2 billion), repair of vandalized pipelines ($1.22 billion), product and crude oil losses ($0.72 billion) and payment to Strategic Alliance Agreements ($0.37 billion). CBN cries foul. Interestingly, this fight presents real opportunities for the Jonathan administration to reposition its brand. The question is, can the president reclaim his image as a “breathe of fresh air”?


March 08, 2014

Nigeria: Next Frontier for Infrastructure Investment
By Eniwoareke Egbeme
Synopsis There is no doubt that Nigeria presents a compelling story for infrastructure investment. Nigeria’s growth rate has been remarkable over the last decade with 7.9 percent growth. The opportunity size for investment over the next 30 years is estimated to be over US$2 trillion. Nigeria has a good strategic planning framework with a close relationship between the Vision 20:2020, Transformation Agenda and National Integrated Infrastructure Master Plan with a vision to provide adequate infrastructure services that support the full mobilization of all economic sectors. This policy brief presents the challenges of investing in Nigeria and the enormous opportunities that lie therein. Thus, recommends being savvy to invest in Nigeria.


March 04, 2014

Delay, Funding May Hamper Marginal Fields’ Sale
By SweetCrude (Vanguard)
Synopsis In this article published in the Sweetcrude of Vanguard Newspaper, Patrick Okigbo was extensively quoted expressing his disbelief in the success of the sale of marginal fields if continued with the present process. He posits that for the sale of marginal field to be successful, it should be well structured and more transparent.


May 02, 2013

Policy Implications of the Petroleum Host Communities Fund
By Patrick O.Okigbo III, Adeoye Adefulu, Ruby Onwudiwe
Synopsis The Petroleum Host Community Fund (“PHCF”), as contained in the 2012 Petroleum Industry Bill (“PIB”), has been touted as an initiative to address a variety of developmental problems in the Niger Delta and to bring peace to the region. The Bill does not however lay out in a clear manner how these objectives are to be met and appears to suggest that the allocation of more funds on its own is enough. Recent history has shown that in spite of the significant funds allocated to the Niger Delta, progress has been limited. In view of the many challenges faced in the utilisation of the funds currently allocated to the Niger Delta and the contentious issues surrounding the inclusion of the PHCF in the PIB, this paper recommends the excision of the PHCF provisions and government’s concentration on implementing a community led developmental approach in the management of the existing Niger Delta intervention funds.


February 28, 2013

Saving Nigeria’s Aluminium Industry
Now is the Time to Act
By Nextier Research
Synopsis The Nigerian aluminium industry is facing significant threats especially from dumping of products mostly from China. Without concerted intervention from the Federal Government of Nigeria, it is feared that the industry may cease to exist within the coming months. The collapse of that industry will result in significant loss of investments, jobs, and will impact Nigeria’s Gross Domestic Product (GDP). This Paper proffers specific government interventions that do not necessarily provide any undue advantage to Nigerian companies (unfair trade); rather, suggests programmes that create a level playing field for fair competition.


January 31, 2013

Privatising Nigeria’s Electricity Supply Industry
Will there be light?
By Patrick O.Okigbo III and Mmachukwu Onyeka
Synopsis Nigeria 
has 
consistently 
failed
 to 
deliver 
the 
electric 
power
required
 by 
homes,
businesses
 and
 support
 services.
 Various
 efforts
 by
 the
 government
 to
 improve
 service
 delivery
 resulted
 in
 failure.
 
 The
 Federal
 Government
 decided
 to
 privatise
 the
 sector
 in
 an
 effort
 to
 increase
 electricity
 supply
 and
 improve
 service
 delivery.
 
 This
 Policy
 Brief
 reviews
 the
 goals
 and
 process
 of
 the
 privatisation
 exercise
 to
 ascertain
 whether
 it
 will
 deliver
 the
 expected
 electricity
 at
 the
 end
 of 
the 
process.


March 30, 2012

Download594 downloads

Juiced Up
Creating Market to Drive Agricultural Growth
By Patrick O. Okigbo III
Synopsis This newspaper publication uses the recent commissioning of Teragro Nigeria Limited – the first juice concentrate plant of its kind in Nigeria – to discuss strategies for agribusiness development in Nigeria.  This project, of which Nextier principals played a leading role, was used to showcase the opportunities in agro-processing especially as the country suffers from a significant lack of agro-storage and processing infrastructure.


March 30, 2012

Managing the Size of the National Assembly
By Patrick O. Okigbo III and Mmachukwu Oyeka
Synopsis Since Nigeria’s return to democracy in 1999, the cost of running the National Assembly has been on an upward trajectory even as the percentage of Nigerians living in poverty continues to grow. It is no surprise therefore that Nigerians are becoming more vocal in their demands for a more effective management of the Legislature. This Policy Note, in line with the mandate of the 2011 Constitution Review Committee (CRC), advocates the adoption of a downsized, part‐time, bi‐cameral legislature as one of the efforts to effectively manage the National Assembly.


February 15, 2012

Drafting a New Petroleum Industry Bill
Submissions from industry, civil society organisations, unions and media By Adeoye Adefulu, Aaron Sayne, Gbite Adeniji, Patrick O. Okigbo III and Ronke Onadeko Synopsis At two industry Roundtables held in Lagos between January 31 and February 01 2012, senior figures from the organised private sector, civil society, trade unions and media presented a shortlist of “Must-Have” issues to be considered during the development of the final draft of the Petroleum Industry Bill. This Paper documents the key issues.


January 15, 2012

Nigeria: Petroleum Industry Bill
History, Objectives, Institutions and Controversies
By Awele Okigbo
Synopsis The Petroleum Industry Bill is an attempt to bring under one law the various legislative, regulatory, and fiscal policies, instruments and institutions that govern the Nigerian petroleum industry. The Bill is expected to establish and clarify the rules, procedures and institutions that will entrench good governance, transparency and accountability in the oil and gas sector. It aims to introduce new operational and fiscal terms for revenue management to enable the Nigerian government to retain a higher proportion of the revenues derived from operations in the petroleum industry. The purpose of this document is to articulate in one place the history, objectives, institutions, and controversies shrouding efforts to pass the Bill into law. This document is intended for members of the Nigerian National Assembly, industry stakeholders, decision makers, and policy analysts as a part of Nextier’s effort to support the passage of the Petroleum Industry Bill.


December 30, 2011

Nigeria: Petroleum Industry Bill
The ABC of PIB
By Awele Okigbo
Synopsis The Petroleum Industry Bill (PIB) is an attempt by the Nigerian government to reform the oil and gas industry in order to improve sector efficiency and transparency, increase revenue share and provide incentives to encourage the indigenous oil industry. This document provides a high level summary of the key provisions of the PIB and is intended as a quick reference for industry stakeholders, decision makers, and policy analysts during the ongoing debates.


December 21, 2011

Nigeria: 2012 Federal Budget
What it means for the next 4 years
By Mmachukwu Oyeka
Synopsis The Mini Policy Review is a periodic presentation held in the offices of Nextier Capital Limited to a select audience to discuss critical policy issues. Mmachukwu Oyeka – an Analyst in Nextier Capital Limited – used the 2012 Federal Budget to raise questions about the focus of the Jonathan Administration.


December 15, 2011

Nigeria: Fuel Subsidy Removal
Achieving the Optimal Solution
By Patrick O. Okigbo III and Dili Enekebe
Synopsis The debate over the removal of the subsidy on petroleum products is not about its effectiveness (as an intervention program) or its sustainability (among other conflicting economic demands). Rather, it is about the credibility the Nigerian government lacks and its historical failure to deliver on its promises. The purpose of this document is to provide an independent review of the key issues involved in the debate and to recommend an optimal solution. This document is intended for industry stakeholders, decision makers, and policy analysts as a point of reference during the ongoing debates.

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